Indian, US Navy ready to ideate



Chennai Port Trust chairman Atulya Misra (second from right) inspects the Merchant Navy's guard of honour at the 49th National Maritime Day celebrations at Seafarers Club in Chennai on Thursday.
Chennai Port Trust chairman Atulya Misra (second from right) inspects the Merchant Navy's guard of honour at the 49th National Maritime Day celebrations at Seafarers Club in Chennai on Thursday.

While US Navy ships would stay at Chennai harbour for four days from Saturday so that their sailors could rest and recuperate, they would also utilize the opportunity to involve in mutual professional exchange of information with Indian sailors. “The exercise and drills will be performed in Bay of Bengal for a week from April 10,” he added.Indian Navy sailors can look forward to learning more about deep sea operations from US Navy, while US sailors will be keen to know how Indians successfully undertake anti-piracy operations and coastal security, Commodore Amar K. Mahadevan, Naval-officer in charge, Tamil Nadu and Puducherry, told DC in an exclusive chat on Thursday.
Noting that the joint exercise was planned at fleet headquarters, Mr Mahadevan said the interactions and conference with sailors from both countries would help them mutually. “The US has a very large and modern Navy. We can discuss problems faced in sea and various procedures involved in search and rescue acts and while providing support during calamity,” he added.
The exercise Malabar, probably named after the Malabar Coast in Kerala, where the first joint exercise between Indian Navy and US Navy was performed, is held alternatively on each other’s shores. Similarly, India undertakes bilateral naval exercises with UK Navy named the Konkan series and the French Navy called the Varuna series.
The focus areas of the Malabar exercise would be boarding operations, air defence exercises, helicopter cross deck operations and coordinate anti submarine warfare. The ships that would be involved are USS Carl Vision, USS Bunkerhill, USS Halsey, UNNS Bridge, USS Louisville, INS Satpur, INS Ranvijay, INS Ranvir, INS Kulish and INS Sakthi.
Maritime security takes new multi-dimensional approach
“Young sailors should be prepared for any eventuality. They should know where and whom to contact at times of distress. They should be alert and cautious about what is happening around them,” said Dr P. Misra, principal officer, mercantile marine department at 49th National Maritime Day celebrated with a parade by merchant navy at seafarers club here on Thursday.
“The mariners have overcome several hurdles including accidents arising out of increased traffic and piracy this year. They sacrifice their lives silently and no one remembers them when they die at sea,” Dr Misra added. He further noted that only during such days like national maritime day, we remember seafarers and talk about them.
Commodore Amar K. Mahadevan, Naval-officer in charge, Tamil Nadu and Puducherry, noted that the country is thinking about maritime security in multi-dimensional contexts namely military, economic and political. He added that war, piracy, international terrorism, drug smuggling and environment degradation are very much part of it.
Chennai Port Trust chairman Atulya Misra said the country needed more trained hands in merchant navy to grab opportunities in the growing maritime trade. “We have 7,500 km of coastline, nine states abetting sea coast and 40 districts having sea front,” he added.
G. R. K. Reddy, CMD, Marg Group, who developed Karaikal Port in a joint venture with Puducherry government said the country ranks 17th in the world in terms of shipping tonnage.
“At present 90 per cent of India’s international trade in terms of volume and 77 per cent in terms of value is moved by sea. India continues to have the largest merchant shipping fleet among the developing countries,” he added.

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Thursday, April 5, 2012

Indian, US Navy ready to ideate


Chennai Port Trust chairman Atulya Misra (second from right) inspects the Merchant Navy's guard of honour at the 49th National Maritime Day celebrations at Seafarers Club in Chennai on Thursday.
Chennai Port Trust chairman Atulya Misra (second from right) inspects the Merchant Navy's guard of honour at the 49th National Maritime Day celebrations at Seafarers Club in Chennai on Thursday.

While US Navy ships would stay at Chennai harbour for four days from Saturday so that their sailors could rest and recuperate, they would also utilize the opportunity to involve in mutual professional exchange of information with Indian sailors. “The exercise and drills will be performed in Bay of Bengal for a week from April 10,” he added.Indian Navy sailors can look forward to learning more about deep sea operations from US Navy, while US sailors will be keen to know how Indians successfully undertake anti-piracy operations and coastal security, Commodore Amar K. Mahadevan, Naval-officer in charge, Tamil Nadu and Puducherry, told DC in an exclusive chat on Thursday.
Noting that the joint exercise was planned at fleet headquarters, Mr Mahadevan said the interactions and conference with sailors from both countries would help them mutually. “The US has a very large and modern Navy. We can discuss problems faced in sea and various procedures involved in search and rescue acts and while providing support during calamity,” he added.
The exercise Malabar, probably named after the Malabar Coast in Kerala, where the first joint exercise between Indian Navy and US Navy was performed, is held alternatively on each other’s shores. Similarly, India undertakes bilateral naval exercises with UK Navy named the Konkan series and the French Navy called the Varuna series.
The focus areas of the Malabar exercise would be boarding operations, air defence exercises, helicopter cross deck operations and coordinate anti submarine warfare. The ships that would be involved are USS Carl Vision, USS Bunkerhill, USS Halsey, UNNS Bridge, USS Louisville, INS Satpur, INS Ranvijay, INS Ranvir, INS Kulish and INS Sakthi.
Maritime security takes new multi-dimensional approach
“Young sailors should be prepared for any eventuality. They should know where and whom to contact at times of distress. They should be alert and cautious about what is happening around them,” said Dr P. Misra, principal officer, mercantile marine department at 49th National Maritime Day celebrated with a parade by merchant navy at seafarers club here on Thursday.
“The mariners have overcome several hurdles including accidents arising out of increased traffic and piracy this year. They sacrifice their lives silently and no one remembers them when they die at sea,” Dr Misra added. He further noted that only during such days like national maritime day, we remember seafarers and talk about them.
Commodore Amar K. Mahadevan, Naval-officer in charge, Tamil Nadu and Puducherry, noted that the country is thinking about maritime security in multi-dimensional contexts namely military, economic and political. He added that war, piracy, international terrorism, drug smuggling and environment degradation are very much part of it.
Chennai Port Trust chairman Atulya Misra said the country needed more trained hands in merchant navy to grab opportunities in the growing maritime trade. “We have 7,500 km of coastline, nine states abetting sea coast and 40 districts having sea front,” he added.
G. R. K. Reddy, CMD, Marg Group, who developed Karaikal Port in a joint venture with Puducherry government said the country ranks 17th in the world in terms of shipping tonnage.
“At present 90 per cent of India’s international trade in terms of volume and 77 per cent in terms of value is moved by sea. India continues to have the largest merchant shipping fleet among the developing countries,” he added.

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