US Army to seek C-12 replacement deal




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The US Army's newly established project office for fixed-wing aircraft has started work on a new programme to replace the service's fleet of Hawker Beechcraft C-12 utility aircraft.
"We're looking at putting a programme together called the future fixed-wing utility aircraft," says Col Brian Tachias, the army's project manager for fixed-wing aircraft. "Right now the requirements document is working in the Pentagon."
Once that initial capabilities document is approved, the army can begin an analysis of alternatives, he says. That could be approved later this year.
Then the service would be able to put together a capabilities development document, which would also have to be blessed by higher headquarters before an acquisition effort could start.
The US Army has 117 C-12s it needs to replace, but whatever succeeds the twin-turboprop, it is likely it should also be able to replace its special electronic mission aircraft fleet, which includes the RC-12 Guardrail and other intelligence-gathering types, Tachias says.
"But that's all work in progress," he says, adding that the service has a long way to go before it makes any final decisions.
The army needs to decide which intelligence-gathering capabilities and aircraft it wants to retain after the war in Afghanistan winds down.
Meanwhile, the service has bought three new Viking Air Series 400 Twin Otter aircraft that are being modified, Tachias says. One of those aircraft will be delivered in the third or fourth quarter of 2012, he adds. The aircraft are for use by the service's Golden Knights parachute demonstration team.
The fixed-wing aircraft office is also working on acquiring four Hawker Beechcraft T-6 turboprop trainers to replace four aged Beechcraft T-34s used by the Army Test and Evaluation Command, Tachias says.

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Thursday, April 5, 2012

US Army to seek C-12 replacement deal



photo



The US Army's newly established project office for fixed-wing aircraft has started work on a new programme to replace the service's fleet of Hawker Beechcraft C-12 utility aircraft.
"We're looking at putting a programme together called the future fixed-wing utility aircraft," says Col Brian Tachias, the army's project manager for fixed-wing aircraft. "Right now the requirements document is working in the Pentagon."
Once that initial capabilities document is approved, the army can begin an analysis of alternatives, he says. That could be approved later this year.
Then the service would be able to put together a capabilities development document, which would also have to be blessed by higher headquarters before an acquisition effort could start.
The US Army has 117 C-12s it needs to replace, but whatever succeeds the twin-turboprop, it is likely it should also be able to replace its special electronic mission aircraft fleet, which includes the RC-12 Guardrail and other intelligence-gathering types, Tachias says.
"But that's all work in progress," he says, adding that the service has a long way to go before it makes any final decisions.
The army needs to decide which intelligence-gathering capabilities and aircraft it wants to retain after the war in Afghanistan winds down.
Meanwhile, the service has bought three new Viking Air Series 400 Twin Otter aircraft that are being modified, Tachias says. One of those aircraft will be delivered in the third or fourth quarter of 2012, he adds. The aircraft are for use by the service's Golden Knights parachute demonstration team.
The fixed-wing aircraft office is also working on acquiring four Hawker Beechcraft T-6 turboprop trainers to replace four aged Beechcraft T-34s used by the Army Test and Evaluation Command, Tachias says.

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