India, Pak fail to make breakthrough on Siachen




As expected the two-day defence secretary level dialogue between India and Pakistan starting on Monday in Rawalpindi on Siachen issue could not achieve any breakthrough with Islamabad not agreeing to New Delhi’s proposal to authenticate present troop position of both the countries.
India has stated time and again that authentication will be the first step towards ultimate objective of demilitarisation of the world’s highest battlefield where armies of both the countries are deployed since 1984.
In fact, Defence Minister AK Antony had last week asked not to expect any “dramatic announcement or decision after the talks” and indicated that India will abide by its stated position about authentication.”
Issuing a communique in New Delhi after the talks ended between Defence Secretary Shashikant Sharma and his Pakistani counterpart Nargis Sethi on Tuesday, Defence Ministry spokesman Sitanshu Kar said, “India and Pakistan reaffirmed their resolve to make serious, sustained and result-oriented efforts for seeking an amicable resolution of Siachen.”
In a joint statement issued in Pakistan, it was agreed to continue dialogue on Siachen in keeping with the desire of the leaders of both countries for early resolution of all outstanding issues, he said, adding both sides “acknowledged that the ceasefire (in Siachen) was holding
since 2003.” The next round of talks will take place in New Delhi on mutually convenient dates.
India’s stated position on authentication comes in the backdrop of Pakistan Army and militants crossing the Line of Control and building bunkers in Kargil leading to a war in 1999.
Prior to 1999, the Indian and Pakistan armies used to vacate their respective posts during the winter months due to snow and inclement weather. Cautious after the Kargil experience, the Indian Army raised 14 Corps to man its posts throughout the year.
Meanwhile, PTI reported from Islamabad that emerging from talks, Sethi said Islamabad wants both sides to simultaneously pull out troops from Siachen. She also told reporters deployment of troops on the glacier is affecting the environment and talks on the issue should be speeded up.
According to Pakistani media reports, the Pakistani side renewed its call for demilitarising the Siachen glacier and pulling back troops to the positions in 1984.
The Pakistani side further called for the resolution of the issue in the light of arrangements discussed in 1989 and 1992.
The Indian Government made it clear that any settlement must include the authentication and demarcation of current military positions on Siachen. The move is aimed at thwarting the possible re-induction of troops by Pakistan after any demilitarisation of the glacier.
Islamabad has stepped up calls to demilitarise the Siachen glacier in the wake of an avalanche that killed 139 people at a high-altitude Pakistan Army camp on April 7

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Tuesday, June 12, 2012

India, Pak fail to make breakthrough on Siachen



As expected the two-day defence secretary level dialogue between India and Pakistan starting on Monday in Rawalpindi on Siachen issue could not achieve any breakthrough with Islamabad not agreeing to New Delhi’s proposal to authenticate present troop position of both the countries.
India has stated time and again that authentication will be the first step towards ultimate objective of demilitarisation of the world’s highest battlefield where armies of both the countries are deployed since 1984.
In fact, Defence Minister AK Antony had last week asked not to expect any “dramatic announcement or decision after the talks” and indicated that India will abide by its stated position about authentication.”
Issuing a communique in New Delhi after the talks ended between Defence Secretary Shashikant Sharma and his Pakistani counterpart Nargis Sethi on Tuesday, Defence Ministry spokesman Sitanshu Kar said, “India and Pakistan reaffirmed their resolve to make serious, sustained and result-oriented efforts for seeking an amicable resolution of Siachen.”
In a joint statement issued in Pakistan, it was agreed to continue dialogue on Siachen in keeping with the desire of the leaders of both countries for early resolution of all outstanding issues, he said, adding both sides “acknowledged that the ceasefire (in Siachen) was holding
since 2003.” The next round of talks will take place in New Delhi on mutually convenient dates.
India’s stated position on authentication comes in the backdrop of Pakistan Army and militants crossing the Line of Control and building bunkers in Kargil leading to a war in 1999.
Prior to 1999, the Indian and Pakistan armies used to vacate their respective posts during the winter months due to snow and inclement weather. Cautious after the Kargil experience, the Indian Army raised 14 Corps to man its posts throughout the year.
Meanwhile, PTI reported from Islamabad that emerging from talks, Sethi said Islamabad wants both sides to simultaneously pull out troops from Siachen. She also told reporters deployment of troops on the glacier is affecting the environment and talks on the issue should be speeded up.
According to Pakistani media reports, the Pakistani side renewed its call for demilitarising the Siachen glacier and pulling back troops to the positions in 1984.
The Pakistani side further called for the resolution of the issue in the light of arrangements discussed in 1989 and 1992.
The Indian Government made it clear that any settlement must include the authentication and demarcation of current military positions on Siachen. The move is aimed at thwarting the possible re-induction of troops by Pakistan after any demilitarisation of the glacier.
Islamabad has stepped up calls to demilitarise the Siachen glacier in the wake of an avalanche that killed 139 people at a high-altitude Pakistan Army camp on April 7

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