Indian Navy to commission indigenously built NOPV INS Saryu


The Indian Navy is poised to welcome a new ship into its impressive fleet. INS Saryu, the lead ship of the indigenous naval offshore patrol vessel (NOPV) class of ships will be commissioned into the Indian Navy on Monday in Goa by Air Marshal PK Roy, commander-in-chief, Andaman and Nicobar command.


The ship-measuring 105 metres in length and having a displacement of 2,300 tonnes-has been indigenously designed and built by Goa shipyard limited (GSL).

GSL chairman and managing director Rear Admiral (Retd) Vineet Bakhshi told TOI that the shipyard now lays claim to have become the first in the country to indigenously design and build naval warships.

"INS Saryu is the best vessel we have made in terms of design, performance and quality," he said.

Bakhshi said the ship, designed by GSL's in-house design team, had "met all design parameters". A vessel such as Saryu takes around 3.5 years to complete and GSL is scheduled to deliver three more NOPVs to the Indian Navy, he said.

Saryu will be commanded by Cdr Amanpreet Singh-who will be commanding a ship for the second time-and will be based at Port Blair. Some 8 officers and 105 sailors will sail aboard the vessel. The induction of Saryu in the Andaman and Nicobar command is expected to tremendously enhance the off-shore surveillance and maritime patrolling capability around the island territories.

Capable of sailing 6,000 nautical miles or around two months at sea without replenishment, the ship will primarily be tasked with ocean surveillance and patrolling in the form of exclusive economic zone (EEZ) surveillance, anti-piracy patrols and fleet support operations.

Equipped with potent weapons such as two 30 mm guns and a SRGM 76.2 mm gun, as well as advanced sensors and state-of-the-art navigation equipment, Saryu will provide maritime security to off-shore assets and carry out escort operations of high value assets.

Among the other systems onboard are an electro-optic fire control system, latest navigational and early warning radars, chaff launchers for self protection and an integrated ESM system. The entire propulsion and power management of the ship is controlled electronically through a remote control system which also incorporates the automatic power management system. Saryu is fitted with a fully integrated LAN system onboard along with a CCTV management system to ensure optimal utilization of onboard equipment and better crew efficiency.

Saryu is propelled by two SEMT Pielstick diesel engines which are the largest engines of its type to be inducted in the Indian Navy, and enable the ship to achieve speeds in excess of 25 knots. The ship is also equipped with two rigid inflatable fast-motor boats.

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Friday, January 18, 2013

Indian Navy to commission indigenously built NOPV INS Saryu

The Indian Navy is poised to welcome a new ship into its impressive fleet. INS Saryu, the lead ship of the indigenous naval offshore patrol vessel (NOPV) class of ships will be commissioned into the Indian Navy on Monday in Goa by Air Marshal PK Roy, commander-in-chief, Andaman and Nicobar command.


The ship-measuring 105 metres in length and having a displacement of 2,300 tonnes-has been indigenously designed and built by Goa shipyard limited (GSL).

GSL chairman and managing director Rear Admiral (Retd) Vineet Bakhshi told TOI that the shipyard now lays claim to have become the first in the country to indigenously design and build naval warships.

"INS Saryu is the best vessel we have made in terms of design, performance and quality," he said.

Bakhshi said the ship, designed by GSL's in-house design team, had "met all design parameters". A vessel such as Saryu takes around 3.5 years to complete and GSL is scheduled to deliver three more NOPVs to the Indian Navy, he said.

Saryu will be commanded by Cdr Amanpreet Singh-who will be commanding a ship for the second time-and will be based at Port Blair. Some 8 officers and 105 sailors will sail aboard the vessel. The induction of Saryu in the Andaman and Nicobar command is expected to tremendously enhance the off-shore surveillance and maritime patrolling capability around the island territories.

Capable of sailing 6,000 nautical miles or around two months at sea without replenishment, the ship will primarily be tasked with ocean surveillance and patrolling in the form of exclusive economic zone (EEZ) surveillance, anti-piracy patrols and fleet support operations.

Equipped with potent weapons such as two 30 mm guns and a SRGM 76.2 mm gun, as well as advanced sensors and state-of-the-art navigation equipment, Saryu will provide maritime security to off-shore assets and carry out escort operations of high value assets.

Among the other systems onboard are an electro-optic fire control system, latest navigational and early warning radars, chaff launchers for self protection and an integrated ESM system. The entire propulsion and power management of the ship is controlled electronically through a remote control system which also incorporates the automatic power management system. Saryu is fitted with a fully integrated LAN system onboard along with a CCTV management system to ensure optimal utilization of onboard equipment and better crew efficiency.

Saryu is propelled by two SEMT Pielstick diesel engines which are the largest engines of its type to be inducted in the Indian Navy, and enable the ship to achieve speeds in excess of 25 knots. The ship is also equipped with two rigid inflatable fast-motor boats.
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